Oriental kit

Talk about your greatest costume creation, or ask questions about how to get hold of / make certain things.

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Carol the Cloak Lady
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Carol the Cloak Lady » Thu Jun 05, 2014 2:46 pm

Hi Ben, I don't know if you sourced your oriental kit, but here are a few ideas on practicality and styles that work well in an outdoor or combat scenario.

When you say "oriental" there are many, many other styles than your basic judo/ninja stuff, and you might want to consider creating your own unique take by looking at images of warrior costumes from "eastern" history: The Crusader States in 12C, or the 13thC El Cid stuff from Moorish Spain would be a good start, as many images show detail of the decorations that were used to embellish their clothes and armour, to create that Eastern/Oriental feel. Look also at images from medieval Indian history: their stuff was absolutely gorgeous and designed to be combat-friendly whilst still being stylish. Or look at stuff from the period of Ghengis Khan... Do you know the SCA (Society of Constructive Anachronisms)? See if you can find any "oriental" kingdoms on their boards and go look at the gallery for their costumes. Their costumes are usually first-class.

The thing to remember with the Japanese style jackets and trousers that you'll find online is that their combat styles were very ritualised and almost choreographed, even if they were "to the death". Also, when fighting, all those lose sleeves were usually pinned up onto the shoulder or above the elbow BEFORE the combat began, and the baggy pants were usually tied, crossgartered, from ankle to knee so there was nothing flapping around or getting in the way. Better to have a close fit sleeve that a baggy one, or no sleeve at all. Baggy pants need a way to be gathered in at the ankle and also, preferably, at the knee, then they can also be worn with boots comfortably. I can make this style for you in any length or width that you need for probably less than you would pay IF you could find them online...

Even with LARP weapons, you need a bit of padding, so take a close look at the Terracotta Warriors for detail of their quilted jackets and tabards and lammellar leather armour. These are all things that could be made today, quite easily, and styled to suit the needs of your character with very little difficulty. You mentioned in your posts that you are a, ahem, LARGE lad. If you'd like to talk further, possibly about making and designing your own made-to-measure and customised kit, drop me a message.

Carol

Luke
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Luke » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:01 pm

Hi Carol. I am completely struggling to find any samurai esque kit for a character. The trousers you mentions, I'm guessing are like Hakuma but tied ar the legs sound very appealing.

You mention armour as well, something I am definitely looking for, though full sets of Lammellar don't really fit the bill for the price. In a few weeks I will send you a message if this all sounds achievable?
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Carol the Cloak Lady
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Carol the Cloak Lady » Sat Jun 07, 2014 1:46 am

Short answer: yes. give me a ring on 0208 926 7696 evenings after 8pm to Midnight. In the mean time think about what you want your character to be able to do, and what kind of environment you are going to be LARPing in. There's a lesson I learned from my Gran about making costumes: "Function determines form." Your samurai-esque costume must be functional; to be able to move in, and be comfortable, and not have anything restricting the range of movements you need, or that would hamper you in a given environment: ie mud, wet, wind and hakama do not work well together. A different style of trousers may be better. We can talk about this when you are ready. have a think and see what you can imagine. Fake armour is actually quite easy to make cheaply... Been there, done that (:

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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Will » Mon Jun 09, 2014 8:18 pm

I like proactive kit makers :)
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Ben
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Ben » Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:59 pm

"And unconscious people always count as willing"

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Carol the Cloak Lady
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Carol the Cloak Lady » Sat Jun 14, 2014 3:32 am

Yuk! Sorry, could not help myself..., then "HOW MUCH!!!???"
After I'd calmed down a bit I took a closer look. This armour looks incomplete. It's missing the throat guard and the thigh guards. The shoulder guards and greaves seem too be from a different set of armour: they are certainly a different colour and the patterning seems to be different. What is it made of? Leather or metal? Balsa wood?
Looking at the nice patterned macrame holding all the plates together, I have to think that it looks good but it is very impractical when you consider how sharp a samurai sword is. Even a glancing cut will leave half the armour hanging off it's backing because the knotwork is so vulnerable. This is not working armour, in my opinion.

Certainly elements of of this suit could be used as a basis to construct something which might be similar in appearance, but more effective as protection. What do other people think?

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Ben
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Ben » Sat Jun 14, 2014 6:44 pm

Too much for my price range but posting it up in case it interests others.

Knock a bit off the price for the fact there are 2 swords and a spear included (if in good condition then those could be worth £100-150).

It's made by http://www.nortonarmouries.com/#!produc ... armour-set so it will be made from polyurethane. I love their stuff: it's lightweight and seems to take a lot of punishment and last forever. This seems to be a custom finish (I assume the original owner wanted it for a reason).

I can't see this helmet on their site so I'd want to know where that came from and what it's made of.
"And unconscious people always count as willing"

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Carol the Cloak Lady
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Carol the Cloak Lady » Mon Jun 16, 2014 11:47 pm

:D :D Yes, it's very expensive, and I see the seller has had to relist the suite of armour because it didn't sell...

I've only ever made armour that was stiffened fabric/leather, or segmented plating (usually a leatherette laminated onto fibreglass/resin/plastic), so I don't know that much about polyurethane and LARP-safe gear. In my day (early 70's) we used real weapons and real armour to go "Mything About in the Woods" - this was in the days before gaming and LARP I think.

Anyway, I was reading back through the posts and came up with a sort of Japanese idea for your kit. Tell me what you think; I'm not sure if I am on the right track or not...

Oriental Style kit: Suit comprising:-

Loose fitting, part pleated trousers with elasticated and drawstring flat waistband (NOT Hakama). For Winterwear these trousers could be of a heavy satin or brocade. For Summerwear, cotton or rayon.

Wrapover long/short/sleeveless vest, beneath a wrapover loose fitting, hip length kimono with a soft fabric sash belt on the waist. Depending on time of year/temperature these items can be made from heavy or lightweight fabrics. Different colours or fabrics can be combined to give different pattern combinations.

Over the top of the Kimono a hip length, sleeveless, open jacket (like a haori, but more fitted and slightly “A” line), preferably quilted with a vertical stitch and perhaps appropriate symbols quilted or embroidered into the panels, or a midweight silk brocade for non-combat scenarios/Summerwear. Although worn open, the jacket should have concealed fasteners at the neck and waist so the jacket can be closed for combat.

Additional kit accessories to convert the suit for combat mode:

A thick padded wrapover cowl to protect the neck, throat and shoulders.

Padded sleeves that can be tied onto the shoulders of the padded jacket.

Matching lycra padded gauntlets that extend down over the knuckles.

Elasticated lycra calf cuffs to gather in the hem of the trousers and provide protection for the shins (think a padded shinguard stretching from just below the knee to just above the ankle, attached to a tube of stretch satin in the same colour as the trousers, with the hem of the trousers pleated together and laid flat against the skin UNDER the tube, so it looks like the cuff is actually the bottom part of the trousers). This will lift the hem of the trousers and create the look of a shorter, combat style garment

a sleeveless, segmented suite of body armour, coming down to mid thigh. This can be made of leather, metal or bamboo and stitched to a thick cotton backing, or linked together with cotton cord for more flexibility. Additional segments can also be added to the padded sleeves, gauntlets and cuffs to make them match.

Colours: I would recommend a basic black for the trousers and kimono, with perhaps a dark blue or dark green for the jacket and accessories. For some reason I cannon explain, dark blue tends to flatter and thin the outline, green has a similar effect but is not as effective. Red works only if you are thin, because it makes you seem much wider than you actually are: a bit like being on TV!

How does that sound to you? Comments? Suggestions? Orders??? :D

andrewbucknell
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby andrewbucknell » Tue Jun 17, 2014 9:13 am

sounds awesome, now give it a sketch to show it off before trialling a set.

dribbling at the thought.

Andrew
oriental fan

Carol the Cloak Lady
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Carol the Cloak Lady » Tue Jun 17, 2014 6:35 pm

I can't draw to save my life, but provide me with a model who can come and be fitted for the outfit, and I could probably knock up a complete suit in a week for about 80-100 pounds (not including the segmented armour which would take about a month to make/bake/cure/paint/stitch/cord and the accessories). Give me a call if you are interested - my number is in an earlier post here. I already have dark blue quilted material and black lycra to hand, so just the trousers and shirt/vest fabrics need to be bought. I can quote you prices for the accessories which will depend on how fancy you want them.

The point of the crossover vest under the kimono-shirt is to give the impression of multiple layers after the Japanese fashion, while the jacket is more along Mongol lines. But the beauty of having hand-made stuff is that if you have your own ideas of how you want something to look, that can be incorporated. I can also do hand embroidery or block printing (Imake my own printing blocks) to embellish clothing. I'm a bit of a "Jill-of-all-trades"! (:

Carol the Cloak Lady
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Re: Oriental kit

Postby Carol the Cloak Lady » Wed Jun 18, 2014 12:22 am

Ooop, sorry, I forgot to describe the trousers. The trousers have a flat, elasticated waistband with a side fastening drawstring. The front of the trousers will have 3 large inward turning pleats on each side, with the 2 central pleats meeting at the centre front. The same pattern will be repeated at the back. In motion this will give complete freedom of movement, whilst standing still, the pleats will fall flat and give a straight slimming outline. To keep the pleats from falling out (especially when wet or after washing) I suggest using small decorative stitches or a decorative patch applied across the pleats at the front just above the knee, and at the back, just below. This will make it easier to fold the hem of the trousers under the pleats when using the calf cuffs. Decorative stitches or invisible stitches would probably be more comfortable, but the patch would allow you to add emblems or symbols to the costume in a subtle manner.

There you have it.


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